Prayers for the President

Attend an American Orthodox parish today, of any jurisdiciton, and you’re likely to hear prayers offered for the President of the United States (and, in some parishes, for the other branches of government as well). The first evidence I’ve been able to find of such prayers is from the journal Christian Union, 10/4/1871: Bishop Johannes,…

Bishop Savas of Troas on the Episcopal Assembly

Bishop Savas of Troas, the Director of the Office of Society and Culture of the Greek Archdiocese, is one of the most visible Greek hierarchs in America. Recently, he was interviewed by Fr. Christopher Metropoulos for the Orthodox Christian Network. To listen to the 17-minute interview, click here. Click here to read all of OrthodoxHistory.org’s ongoing coverage…

Lecture at the Clergy-Laity Congress

For any of our readers who will be attending the upcoming Greek Archdiocese Clergy-Laity Congress in Atlanta: On Monday and Tuesday (July 5 and 6), I will be giving a talk on early Greek Orthodoxy in America. My talk focuses roughly on the 1860-1920 period, and regular readers of OrthodoxHistory.org will recognize a lot of…

Protestant brides and Greek grooms in DC, 1906

Regular readers of this website have no doubt noticed that I am really interested in early American converts to Orthodoxy. There weren’t too many, but the handfuls of people who did join the Church in the late 19th and early 20th century almost always present fascinating stories. The most notable converts, in terms of visibility,…

Rethinking the Myth of Unity

One year ago, I delivered a paper at St. Vladimir’s Seminary entitled, “The Myth of Unity and the Origins of Jurisdictional Pluralism in American Orthodoxy.” (Click here for the audio.) My thesis was that, contrary to a widely-held belief, American Orthodoxy was not administratively united prior to the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. Rather, from a very…