Matthew Namee

Matthew Namee serves as editor of OrthodoxHistory.org. He specializes in the history of Orthodoxy in America from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries. His publications include "Father Raphael Morgan: The First Orthodox Priest of African Descent in America" in St. Vladimir's Theological Quarterly (2009), Wichita's Lebanese Heritage (coauthor, 2010), and the Atlas of American Orthodox Christian Churches (contributing author, 2011). He has lectured at numerous conferences and hosts the American Orthodox History podcast on Ancient Faith Radio. Matthew is the former research assistant to baseball author and Boston Red Sox executive Bill James, and he helped to produce the Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers (2004). Also in 2004, Matthew cofounded The Hardball Times, a popular baseball website. He earned his J.D. from the University of Kansas in December 2012, and currently works as an associate in the employee benefits department at Hinkle Law Firm in Wichita, Kansas. He and his wife Catherine have three children. Matthew can be contacted at mfnamee [at] gmail [dot] com.


mnamee@hinklaw.com

The Life of Fr. Joseph Xanthopoulos


NOTE: This is a revised version of my original article. In that article, a central theme was that Fr. Joseph was half Greek and half Lebanese. I have since had the privilege of speaking with his granddaughter, who told me that he was actually 100% Greek, although he was fluent...

The Birth of Fr. Raphael Morgan


So I think I found something I've been looking for for many, many years -- the birthdate of Fr. Raphael Morgan, the first black Orthodox priest in America. First, the backstory. Until now, the closest I've been able to get to nailing down a birthdate for Fr. Raphael is to...

Jordanville to host conference on St. Sergius of Radonezh


One of our SOCHA advisory board members is Deacon Andrei Psarev, church history instructor at Holy Trinity Seminary in Jordanville, NY. He's asked us to help spread the word about a conference being held at Jordanville on October 10 and 11 to commemorate the 700th anniversary of the birth of St....

Orthodox bishops in 1859


I ran across this the other day -- in 1859, there were 278 Orthodox bishops in the world: Church Bishops Constantinople (including Romania, Bulgaria, and part of Serbia) 136 Russia (including Georgia) 65 Greece 24 Antioch 17 Jerusalem 14 Austria (now Serbia, mostly) 11 Alexandria 5 Cyprus 4 Mount Sinai 1...

Today in American Orthodox History: May 13


On May 13, 1888, a diverse group of Orthodox men, mostly from Greece and the Balkans, met in Chicago to discuss the formation of a multiethnic Orthodox parish. That meeting was the topic of one of the very first posts on this blog, back in 2009. And also one of...

New document on life of Fr. Nicola Yanney


Fr. Nicola Yanney is one of my favorite priests in the history of Orthodoxy in America. He immigrated to America at age 19, in 1892-93, with his new wife. They immediately settled in, of all places, Nebraska. Nine years later, she gave birth to their fifth child -- and died...

Amazing photo collage of Antiochian priests, circa 1920


First of all, I'm really sorry for my extended absence from this website. Beginning in December, my life went pretty crazy -- first the end of law school, then studying for the bar exam, and then moving and starting my legal career. Unfortunately, I've had no time at all for...

A Snapshot of Interwar Orthodoxy: The Ecumenical Patriarchate


Yesterday, we began publishing a series of excerpts from Matthew Spinka's 1935 article on worldwide Orthodoxy in the years following World War I, originally published in the journal Church History.Spinka's article is a succinct and quite balanced summary of the state of affairs in global Orthodoxy in a very chaotic period....

A Snapshot of Interwar Orthodoxy: Introduction


In the June 1935 issue of the journal Church History, Matthew Spinka of the Chicago Theological Seminary published a 20-page article entitled, "Post-War Eastern Orthodox Churches." The "War" he was referring to was, of course, World War I, and his article offers a succinct and quite balanced snapshot of the...