Matthew Namee

Matthew Namee serves as editor of OrthodoxHistory.org. He specializes in the history of Orthodoxy in America from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries. His publications include "Father Raphael Morgan: The First Orthodox Priest of African Descent in America" in St. Vladimir's Theological Quarterly (2009), Wichita's Lebanese Heritage (coauthor, 2010), and the Atlas of American Orthodox Christian Churches (contributing author, 2011). He has lectured at numerous conferences and hosts the American Orthodox History podcast on Ancient Faith Radio. Matthew is the former research assistant to baseball author and Boston Red Sox executive Bill James, and he helped to produce the Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers (2004). Also in 2004, Matthew cofounded The Hardball Times, a popular baseball website. He earned his J.D. from the University of Kansas in December 2012, and currently works as an associate in the employee benefits department at Hinkle Law Firm in Wichita, Kansas. He and his wife Catherine have three children. Matthew can be contacted at mfnamee [at] gmail [dot] com.


mnamee@hinklaw.com

Early stages of the Bulgarian schism from Constantinople


We just finished running a series of six articles on the 1872 Council of Constantinople, published contemporaneously in the Methodist Quarterly Review. The following article is from about a decade earlier, and describes the early stages of the Bulgarian split from the Patriarchate of Constantinople. This piece is from an...

The “Bulgarian Question” and the 1872 Council of Constantinople, Part 6


This is the final Methodist Quarterly Review article dealing with the aftermath of the 1872 Council of Constantinople. From the Methodist Quarterly Review, April 1874.   The Bulgarian Church question has, on the whole, attracted less attention during the year 1873 than in the previous years. The Bulgarians, undoubtedly, have...

The “Bulgarian Question” and the 1872 Council of Constantinople, Part 2


Yesterday, I ran the first of six articles on the so-called "Bulgarian Question," a controversy that rocked the Orthodox world in the early 1870s and ultimately led to the 1872 Council of Constantinople, which condemned the heresy of "phyletism." Search the Internet -- both Google and the various subscriber-only databases...

The “Bulgarian Question” and the 1872 Council of Constantinople, Part 1


Recently, I had occasion to research the 1872 Council of Constantinople, which somewhat famously condemned "ethno-phyletism." The issue arose because, as I understand it, the Bulgarian Orthodox Church -- which was under the jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarchate -- declared itself autocephalous. Anyway, before I began this research, I could...

Fr. Andreades’ 1867 New Orleans homily


Archimandrite Stephen Andreades was the first priest of Holy Trinity Orthodox Church in New Orleans. He arrived in late 1867, making him the very first resident Orthodox priest in the contiguous United States. Very little is known about Andreades, and most of what we know comes from a short homily...

Freemasonry in American Orthodox history


Once upon a time, it was the norm for American men to be members of fraternal organizations. These were especially attractive to new immigrants, who wanted to be integrated into American society and make progress in business. And in that earlier era, fraternal membership was the best and quickest way to...

Two Greek youths come to America in 1823


Years ago, on an online database, I came across an article titled "The Two Greek Youth" and published in the April 1823 issue of The Guardian, or Youth's Religious Instructor, a short-lived American magazine. According to the article, Protestant missionaries brought these two boys over from Malta to study at...