Category: American South


Agapius Honcharenko in defense of himself


Editor's note: Today, we present the second of three historical documents recently discovered by Nicholas Chapman. On August 24, we published Nicholas' introduction to the documents, and last week, we published a letter by St. Philaret of Moscow on the subject of Orthodoxy in America in 1865. Today's document is...

A visit to the New Orleans Greek church in 1885


Editor's note: The following excerpt appeared in the Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs, published by Will H. Coleman in 1885. It is a rare firsthand account of Holy Trinity church in New Orleans in the 19th century. The priest at the time was Fr. Misael...

The Historical Reality of Greek Orthodoxy in America


Last week, I was privileged to speak at the Greek Archdiocese Clergy-Laity Congress in Atlanta. I gave the same talk on two days, July 5 and 6. Below, we've published the text of my lecture. A couple of things, up front: first, I didn't include footnotes, because this was just...

Early Orthodoxy in Alabama and Georgia


In June of 1900, an Archimandrite Dorotheo -- I don't know his last name -- came to Birmingham, Alabama. He had traveled there from Chicago, although I'm not sure which Chicago parish he was affiliated with. Borrowing a local Episcopal church -- the Church of the Advent -- he performed...

Theophany in American Orthodox history


The latest episode of my American Orthodox History podcast is up over at Ancient Faith Radio. In it, I discuss the feast of Theophany, focusing on several historical celebrations of the feast, including the famous annual celebration at the Greek cathedral in Tarpon Springs, Florida. In the podcast, I read...

The Forgotten Saint of the Forgotten Church on the Forgotten Island


Archimandrite Theoclitos Triantafilides is one of the most remarkable figures in American Orthodox history. An ethnic Greek, he served as tutor to the future Tsar Nicholas II and went on to establish the multiethnic parish of Ss. Constantine and Helen in Galveston, Texas, under the Russian Mission. His story has been mostly untold,...

The death of Fr. Misael Karydis


On December 22, I wrote about the tragic death of Fr. Misael Karydis, longtime pastor of the Greek church in New Orleans. You'll want to read that article first, to follow what I'm talking about today. After I published that piece, I unconvered several more reports on Karydis' death, from...

Fr. Misael Karydis and his flying machine


Archimandrite Misael Karydis spent twenty years as the priest in New Orleans, from 1881 until 1901. Two decades at a single parish is a long time, especially in the early years of American Orthodox history. Before Karydis, only one priest (that I know of) had ever served such a lengthy...

Early priests in New Orleans


Holy Trinity Church in New Orleans was the first organized Orthodox parish in the contiguous United States. Despite that fact, precious little is known about its early history. The first priest to visit New Orleans was the infamous Fr. Agapius Honcharenko, but, contrary to popular belief, Honcharenko was not actually...

Orthodoxy in Colonial Virginia (Part 2)


On the latest episode of our American Orthodox History podcast, Nicholas Chapman recounts the almost incredible story of Orthodox Christianity in colonial Virginia. Last month, we published Nicholas' first article on the subject. Below, he continues his series. On July 4, 1789, after nearly five years of service, Thomas Jefferson was...