Tag: Greek


Who Will Replace Athenagoras?


Editor's note: In our continuing effort to learn more about Greek Archbishop Michael Konstantinides, we are publishing the following article by Ernest Villas, former director of the GOA Department of Religious Education. Mr. Villas died in 2006. This article is reprinted with permission from the Greek Archdiocese of America. In...

The Treasure of Archbishop Michael


Editor's note: In its nine decades of existence, the Greek Archdiocese has been served by only six primates -- Alexander, Athenagoras, Michael, Iakovos, Spyridon, and Demetrios. And 55 of those years are covered by just two men, Athenagoras and Iakovos. That pair looms large over American Orthodoxy, and an argument can...

US Orthodox memorials for Tsar Alexander III


Tsar Alexander III of Russia died on November 1, 1894. A week later (and 116 years ago today), on November 8, two memorial services for the Tsar were held in America. Both were of note, for various reasons. New York had no Russian church in 1894, so the Russian consul...

Clergy salaries in 1916


Before I get started, I wanted to let you all know that I do plan to finish my series on St. Raphael and the Syrian controversies of 1905. However, I've got several other irons in the fire, so I'm going to take a little time off of that project to...

A Greek priest in Arizona in the 17th century (??)


While looking for something else, I happened upon an incredible anecdote in a book called Arizona: A State Guide, by Thomas J. Tormey (Hastings House, 1940). From page 389: TACNA, 79.6 m. (340 alt., 7 pop.), began as a stage station called Antelope Hill. In the seventeenth century, a Greek...

The Greeks in America, 1873


Editor's note: The following article appeared in the New York Times on August 4, 1873. That's nearly two decades before Greek immigrants began to flood into America. According to the book Race, Ethnicity, and Place in a Changing America, only 217 immigrants came from Greece to the US in the...

The Case Against Agapius Honcharenko


Editor's note: Over the past several weeks, we have been publishing some historical documents which Nicholas Chapman recently discovered in London. Here are the relevant links: Nicholas’ introduction to the documents A letter by St. Philaret of Moscow on Orthodoxy in America in 1865 A letter by Agapius Honcharenko in...

Michael Anagnos, “who made the sightless see”


Helen Keller was one of the most famous women in America in the early 20th century. Both deaf and blind, she overcame her disabilities to become a bestselling author and popular lecturer. Keller's tutor, Anne Sullivan, became rather famous in her own right, for her role in training the young...

P.T. Barnum’s widow married in NY Greek church


P.T. Barnum was the greatest showman of the 19th century. Today, he's most closely associated with the circus that bears his name, but in his own day, he was much more than a circus organizer. In an era before blockbuster movies, Barnum was the closest you could get to a...

Fr. Kyrill Johnson: The Prestige of the Oecumenical Patriarchate


Editor's note: On Monday, we introduced Fr. Kyrill Johnson, who converted to Orthodoxy in the 1920s and spent most of his career in the Antiochian Archdiocese. Then, on Tuesday, we presented an article by Johnson reviewing a Protestant translation of the Divine Liturgy. Below, we've published another article by Johnson,...