Tag: newspapers


A Greek bishop in America in 1893


In 1893, the World's Fair was held in Chicago. In conjunction with the Fair, something called the "World's Parliament of Religions" was held from September 11-27. This was a remarkable gathering, which brought together not only Christian leaders of various denominations, but people of every religious stripe -- Jews, Muslims,...

The death of St. Raphael


This past Saturday was February 27, the 95th anniversary of the death of St. Raphael Hawaweeny, the great Syrian Bishop of Brooklyn. His death set off more than a week of commemorations in the Syrian Orthodox community. Telegrams immediately went out to Syrian parishes all over the country. In fact, the...

A Greek church in San Francisco, 1903


  From its founding in 1868, the Russian cathedral in San Francisco was a multiethnic community. In particular, Greeks and Serbs were an integral part of the church, and, at various times, there was an ethnic Greek (Fr. Kallinikos Kanellas) and an ethnic Serb priest (Fr. Sebastian Dabovich) serving the...

An Antiochian priest in Jamaica, 1910


It is well known that, at the turn of the last century, thousands of Syrians/Lebanese made the trip across the Atlantic to New York. What is less well known, at least here in the US, is that many Syrian emigrants went to other parts of the New World, including South...

St. Raphael’s consecration: a newly-discovered photo


St. Raphael was consecrated Bishop of Brooklyn on March 13, 1904. I wrote about this event in July, and my article was accompanied by a small photo of Raphael -- the only known surviving photograph of his consecration. That is, until now.  Last month, I stumbled upon an issue of the...

Today in American Orthodox History: Bjerring’s sermon on unbelief


  On the morning of Sunday, February 9, 1873 -- that is, 137 years ago today -- a crowd assembled in Holy Trinity Russo-Greek Chapel in New York City. The priest, Fr. Nicholas Bjerring, gave an address on "Unbelief and the Indifference in Religion." The whole speech was printed in the...

A Poisoned Chalice? Fr. Ingram Nathaniel Irvine in 1920


As we've discussed previously, in July of 1920, an all-convert, all-English Orthodox parish was founded in New York City. Called the Church of the Transfiguration, the parish was led by the newly-converted Fr. Patrick Mythen. But it was the fulfillment of a long-held dream of the elderly Fr. Ingram Nathaniel...

The Mysterious Death of Fr. Paul Kedrolivansky


On today's episode of my American Orthodox History podcast on Ancient Faith Radio, I tell the story of Fr. Paul Kedrolivansky's suspicious death. For the whole story, you'll want to listen to the podcast. There are quite a few characters involved, and I thought it might be helpful to provide...

Solving the mystery: the 1921 pan-Orthodox gathering of bishops


Back in July, Fr. Andrew wrote about the above photo, which depicts a gathering of American Orthodox bishops in the early 1920s: Greeks Meletios and Alexander, Russians Platon and Alexander, and Syrian Aftimios. At the time of Fr. Andrew's original post, no one knew exactly when this photo was taken,...

The First English-Speaking Parish


For a while now, I have been meaning to write about the first all-English Orthodox parish in America, founded in New York City in 1920. Today, I'm going to give a brief introduction to that parish, and the main characters involved. This is hardly the whole story; it really is...