Matthew Namee

Matthew Namee serves as editor of OrthodoxHistory.org. He specializes in the history of Orthodoxy in America from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries. His publications include "Father Raphael Morgan: The First Orthodox Priest of African Descent in America" in St. Vladimir's Theological Quarterly (2009), Wichita's Lebanese Heritage (coauthor, 2010), and the Atlas of American Orthodox Christian Churches (contributing author, 2011). He has lectured at numerous conferences and hosts the American Orthodox History podcast on Ancient Faith Radio. Matthew is the former research assistant to baseball author and Boston Red Sox executive Bill James, and he helped to produce the Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers (2004). Also in 2004, Matthew cofounded The Hardball Times, a popular baseball website. He earned his J.D. from the University of Kansas in December 2012, and currently works as an associate in the employee benefits department at Hinkle Law Firm in Wichita, Kansas. He and his wife Catherine have three children. Matthew can be contacted at mfnamee [at] gmail [dot] com.


mnamee@hinklaw.com

Ecumenical Patriarch Opposes American Slavery in 1862


At the close of 1862, the Ecumenical Patriarch Joachim II wrote an annual retrospective on the year that had just ended. An American anti-slavery newspaper called the Liberator picked up this part of Joachim's letter in its April 24, 1863 issue: The United States of America, after many years of union...

Harry Truman’s Sacred Cow & Other Amazing Facts About Athenagoras


Archbishop Athenagoras Spyrou led the Greek Archdiocese of North and South America from 1930 until 1948. That year, he was elected Ecumenical Patriarch, a position he held for nearly a quarter century, until his death in 1972. Athenagoras is perhaps most famous (or, in some quarters, infamous) for his landmark...

Who was St. Tikhon?


Full name: Tikhon Bellavin Dates: 1865 to 1925 In America: 1898 to 1907 Who was he? Head of the Russian Archdiocese in North America at the turn of the 20th century, and later Patriarch of Moscow during the Bolshevik Revolution and its bloody aftermath. He was known for being a...

Fr Demetrios Petrides on the death of his son


For various reasons, death seems a particularly present reality right now. Of course, there is the tragic death of Fr Matthew Baker this past Sunday (and, once again, please consider helping his family). The day before Fr Matthew died, some very good friends of mine lost their 6-year-old daughter, who had been...

A more easily pronounced name


The church committee of a Greek orthodox church in New York city are to apply to the Holy Synod in Greece for the appointment of a new pastor to succeed the Rev. Agathodoro A. Papageorgopaulos, who recently resigned the pastorate of that church. If the committee want to “stand in”...

What was the first Orthodox parish in America?


The question, "What was the first Orthodox parish in America?" is surprisingly difficult to answer. A big part of the problem comes from that word, "parish." What is a parish? When does a collection of Orthodox people become a "parish"? It's a matter of interpretation, and particularly in the early...

St Raphael’s Original New York Chapel


St Raphael Hawaweeny arrived in New York City in 1895, and he immediately established a chapel for his growing community of Arab Orthodox Christians. The chapel was located at 77 Washington Street in Manhattan, right next to the Syrian Maronites' own chapel. The Orthodox chapel, called St Nicholas, was a...

A Timeline of the Life of St Raphael


A Brief Timeline of the Life of St Raphael Hawaweeny 1860 - Born in Beirut in November (family returned to Damascus the next year) 1874 - Tonsured reader 1877 - Worked as a middle school and 5th grade teacher (1877-79) 1879 - Tonsured a monk; appointed assistant to Patriarch of Antioch...

Who was St. Raphael under — Antioch or Russia?


Who was St. Raphael under? It depends partly on whom you ask, and it also depends on when you ask. In 1895, when Archimandrite Raphael Hawaweeny came to America to oversee the Syro-Arabs, he was most definitely under the Russian Church. In fact, at the time, he was on the...

We Must Have A Bishop


The following editorial appeared in the Saloniki-Greek Press (a Greek-American newspaper) on Feb. 28, 1914. At the time, there was no Greek bishop in America. Until 1908, the Greek parishes were loosely tied to either the Ecumenical Patriarchate or the Church of Greece, but in 1908, the Ecumenical Patriarchate issued...